Posts tagged ‘RDBMS’

April 9, 2011

3 simple steps to adopt cloud computing

Cloud computing is now synonymous with Flexible Provisioning and Scale. Find out below if you are taking full advantage of cloud computing.

The As Is deployment – lowest adoption cost, reasonable benefits:

Move the server application “as is” to a cloud server. This is nothing but a co-located server, at Amazon for example. The provisioning and maintenance of the application is still a self driven task.

The win is in the dynamic on demand provisioning. Easy to compute the ROI here. Let us say that your application needs to be available all year round – but cater to seasonal demands. Say it costs $400 to host your application to cater to peak demand. You would end up paying 12*400 = $4800 per annum to keep your application up. Most of the time it would be under utilized. Cloud computing has made it really simple to change your compute capacity as easily as setting a reminder in your out look calender. With amazon or google, you could just log into the admin panel and say that you need additional resources only on certain dates. At the end of the month you get billed for the amount of resources you actually consume.

The Managed RDBMS deployment – reasonably low adoption cost, reasonable benefits:

A lot of work has to be done to ensure that the application is available. i.e. a replication strategy and policy to keep the database available. This is still a lot of effort and money. The alternative is a managed RDBMS, where the provider (amazon or google) manages the database. They worry about keeping the data safe from being lost. Much harder to do the ROI here – as the time spent in managing this would have to be offset against opportunity costs. Note that there would be some amount of code restructuring (not a lot) to get this going. An example of this is the Amazon MySQL RDS. At the time of writing, google is yet to announce the availability of their hosted sql service.

The Application Rewrite – highest adoption cost, highest benefits (arguably)

If your goal is to write an application which scales very well then you should consider a complete application rewrite to take advantage of the storage APIs. Hosted RDBMS is still a single machine (or a cluster) running a database server – with bottlenecks – be it memory, cpu, networ or disk.

Cloud computing offers storage APIs to access and manage data unlike traditional methods of file or rdbms storage. Because of the underlying architectural differences, cloud datastore offers better scalability – http://labs.google.com/papers/bigtable.html.